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Written by Vincent Léda

Hunterian Museum

Sir william MacCormac (1839-1901)
President of the College from 1896 to 1900
Alfred Drury,1903

Apesanteur au Hunterian Museum

Légende du musée: »Quintuple foetuses, from a premature birth at about five months. Two of the five were still-born; the other three died shortly after delivery. They were born to a mother in
Blackburn, Landcashire in 1786. A local doctor called John Hull (c1761-1843) attended the birth. He later reported a history of the case to Gilbert Blane (1749-1834), a physician in London, who in turn passed the letter on to Maxwell Gartshore (1732-1812). Garthshore reported the case to the Royal Society in 1787.In the report Hull described how he was allowed to take the bodies of the foetuses, but was not permitted to take the placenta which was burnt in accordance with local custom. He sent the preserved bodies to London and the were placed in John Hunter’s museum.
Hull went on to become a leading obstetrician in Manchester and was a founder and the first President of the Manchester Medical Society. »

Essai

Essai avec option sur tablette. Ça ouvre le champ des possibles….

Hunterian Museum

(Inscription du musée)Skull of a 25-year old man showing enlargement due to hydrocephalus.

This specimen was part of the collection of the surgeon Robert Liston (1794-1847) It was to given to the college in 1842.

Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid witnin cavities inside the brain. This can cause enlargement of the skull in young children while the bones of the skull are still growing. In this case, the condition persisted into early adulthood. It was associated with osteomalacia or’adult rickets’ resulting from vitamin D deficiency

The remainder of the skeleton was also preserved in the museum but was destroyed in 1941.

Hunterian Museum

Hunterian Museum

Bonne année

Bonne année

poses en mouvement

poses en mouvement